{ Real Thoughts }

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I’m reading a book called “Wordsmithy: Hot Tips for the Writing Life” by Douglas Wilson. My daughter gave it to me for my birthday.  It’s funny, inspiring, and short enough to read in a few hours.

In one sitting, I read all the way to section six, which advises:

“Live an actual life out there, a full life, the kind that will generate a surplus of stories.”

So it got me thinking:

Am I living a full, actual life?

Or, do I lose sight of purpose between shuffling laundry loads and racing to town to grab groceries and the discount latte of the day?

(These duties are needful, of course.  Especially the latte.)

I grudgingly left my book and walked out to the garden.

This reassured me that I must be living a real life– a busy life that keeps me from tending weeds and overripe cucumbers wasting away under dry, tangled vines.

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And just then —  with one foot, I stepped on a thistle, while my other foot stepped on a bee, who had been sucking on the clover that grew from an unmowed lawn.

Suddenly, I felt fully alive.

© Lisa M. Luciano

Photo credits:

Laundry — Nik MacMillan

Cucumbers —Markus Spiske

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{ Tending Life’s Garden }

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Picture and poem by Beatrix Potter

 

We have a little garden

A garden of our own

And every day we water there

The seeds that we have sown.

We love our little garden,

And tend it with such care,

You will not find a faded leaf

Or blighted blossom there.

 

When I sow pumpkin seeds, I harvest pumpkins.  When I cover the garden with dandelion-infested mulch, I find lots of dandelions growing later in July.

We know this about gardens, but sometimes forget about the law of sowing and reaping in life. When I sow bad seeds, I will reap bad fruit:

  1. When I gorge on chocolates, I will reap extra pounds.
  2. When I harbor bitterness against someone, I will reap an injured relationship and stifle forgiveness.
  3. When I allow my children to read or watch foolish things, we will reap more foolishness.

And then there are weeds….

  • Weeds grow faster than anything else.  Pull, uproot and destroy before they get so big you need an ax to chop them down.
  • Weeds are tricky.  They can grow and network underground where you can’t see them.  Little sins in the thoughts left unchecked turn into big problems later.
  • Weeds rob the good stuff.  Weeds in a relationship drain us.  We cannot enjoy each other when the annoying, prickly weeds of bad habits are bugging us.

 

Gracious God,
We want to have good soil in our souls,
show us how to tend to our spiritual gardens.
Thank you for the Master Gardener!
In Jesus’ name,
Amen

“Your mind is a garden, your thoughts are the seeds.  The harvest will bring either flowers or weeds.”

“Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.” –Robert Louis Stevenson

Prayer from http://www.flowingfaith.com/2013/03/tending-your-spiritual-garden.html

 

 

{ Deism, Drones & Death: Musings of a Homeschooling Mom. }

What I am learning this week:

  • When you plan a big party, remember to double-check to see if your mother-in-law’s invitation got sent.  (I am in the process of making this right.)

 

  • Little people listen more than we realize. When I asked my children today during American History, “What do you remember about Deism?” I didn’t expect eight-year-old Gianny to be the one itching to answer: “It’s the belief that God set the world in order and then went away until judgment.”

 

  • Drones are cool and come in two main styles: quadracopter and hexacopter. People who get to review drones online are very cool.  People that blow things up using household materials are possibly even cooler. And, I was just informed that the King of Random just flew a drone online for the first time.  That’s cool colliding with awesome. (This information was generously handed to me by my 13-year-old, who offered me the pleasure of watching a 7 minute drone video. I am a blank slate when it comes to knowledge of drones, so I learned a lot.)

 

  • Gardens eventually die. Looking out the window this morning, I saw the bittersweet view of a frosty garden.  I mourned my basil and zinnias for about five seconds and then was grateful I wouldn’t have to battle the tomato slugs anymore. I gathered what I could. Photos attached.

 

  • The last peach in the bowl is always the most precious and sought after.  I could divide it into 12 tiny slices….or just eat it myself after everyone is in bed. 🙂
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I will miss the bright beauty of the zinnias.

 

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Green tomato recipes, here I come.
Isaiah 40:8~ "The grass withers, the flower fades, but the Word of our God stands forever."